Bike Rides about Town:
in 2004
Composite


Roger Kenner
Montreal, Qc,
Canada 2004

Return to Menu
(See Copyright Notice on Menu Page)

Composite: Bike Trails Along the South Shore - Part II

[Overview] [Sainte-Catherine] [La Prairie] [Brossard] [Greenfield Park] [Saint-Lambert] [Longueuil] [Boucherville] [Varennes]

Brossard

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 14:35
Approaching Brossard Line

Having set off along the path into the tall grasses and away from the lake, one can soon see the wall of new suburban development which is Brossard. It stretches across one's path in a straight line, as far to the right and left as the eye can encompass, and makes such a stark contrast to the openness of the open field.

Before reaching the wall of houses, there is a small footbridge over the Rivière Saint-Jacques. This marks the official boundary of Brossard. Just beyond the footbridge, the trail turns briefly to the right and there is a small park, with facilities for cyclists. From a low rise in the park, one can see both up and down the small river.


 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
Kiosk & Brossard Path Approaching River Crossing

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
Crossing the River: Looking North to Highway

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 12:30
Rivermouth

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 14:40
Brossard: River Looking South Brossard: River Looking North & Footbridge

 

Leaving the park and crossing the first suburban street, Avenue Radisson, the trail continues along its own right-of-way through the narrow greenspace of a hydro corridor. Underneath the hydro towers, the trail curves and turns its way over small artificial hills, provided for the enjoyment of cyclists, as the walls of houses crowd in on either side. One continues along this way for two blocks.

The crossing of Chemin des Prairies is a major one, marked by a special traffic light for cyclists. On the far side is another junction in the trail system. A sign indicates that one can continue on along the hydro right-of-way, to points as yet unknown. The main trail follows the busy roadway back to the waterfront. There is a protected right-of-way running through a narrow greenspace to the right-hand side of the road. No houses look upon this major artery. The way is lined by the tall fences of people's back yards

Soon one crosses underneath Route 132 once again, and comes out at a waterfront park.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:00
Brossard: Waterfront Park

 

On my first visit to the park, I had been heading westward and had no idea that a river blocked my way. I had followed the trail down along the water, as far as I could, leaving the park and riding on the shoreline side of people's back yards, until finally my way was blocked and I was forced to backtrack. There is a small point, right at the river's mouth, which the town has allowed to become built up.

I seem to remember coming into the park along the waterfront as well, but I could not find this route on my way eastward. I ended up following the main trail, which parallels the freeway service road, which is actually still considered Boulevard Marie Victorin. I looked longingly to shoreward as I passed a vast complex of tall apartment blocks set amidst acres of green. I saw many cyclist riding along the street to my right, and in future rides I would go that way as well.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:10
Brossard: Along the 132

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
The Champlain Bridge

 

The trail leaves the roadside and heads back onto its own right-of-way, right along the very shoreline, as it winds around the interchange ramps connecting Route 132 with the Champlain Bridge approaches.

Click to Enlarge ((Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:30/Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
Waterfront Section Begins (Looking East: West of Bridge ... or ends (Looking West: West of Bridge)

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:35
Brossard: View Downriver

 

The short way along the river's edge, separated from all the din of traffic by the trees and a healthy green space, is quite a treat. It comes to all-too-soon an end as the way eastward is blocked by a huge private marina, and the St. Lambert Locks complex beyond.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
Path along Shoreline, East of Champlain Bridge

 

Greenfield Park

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:35
Approaching Marina

 

One is shunted inland, underneath Route 132 once again. After one short block into tree-lined older suburbia, the trail picks up alongside Riverside Street, the continuation of Marie Victorin. This approaches Route 132 at an angle as one moves eastward, and within a few short blocks the freeway has been reached.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:40
Along Riverside Street

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 15:40
Back to the 132 Along the 132

 

Past the area of the Saint-Lambert Locks, Riverside Street runs just inland of the Route 132 freeway that hugs the shoreline. At the lock complex, a side trail heads up a long ramp and over the highway to the far side and Montreal. Until quite recently, this was the only section of the South Shore Littoral Trail that I would see, for coming from or heading to Montreal, my way led at right angles.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on 2001 South Shore Ride)
Crossing Over South Shore Highway

 

Saint-Lambert

The scenery remains about the same as one passes underneath the twin rail bridges coming off the Victoria Bridge. Between the two bridges, and half a block inland along Edison Street, there is a small park and an unprotected (as yet) gravel roadway that leads up to track level, where one can see the rail junction as the two routes over the locks come together again.

Once past the railway overpasses, one has entered Saint-Lambert. The trail still runs along the inland side of the Route 132 freeway. There is a small park along the former Saint-Lambert shoreline commemorating the second terminus of the railway to Saint-Jean, extended from La Prairie in the 1850s.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 16:00
St. Lambert Rail Monument
Tablet commemorating the centenary of the 1st Railway line in Canada, the Champlain & St. Lawrence Railroad, in operation July 21st, 1836, and extended to this site in January, 1852
-Erected July 21st, 1936
[View Plaque]

 

At the intersection with Notre Dame, the trail heads once more underneath Route 132 and comes out at the water's edge. There is a small wooden belvedere whence one can look up and down the Seaway channel. The locks of Saint-Lambert now lie some distance westward.

The trail heads off eastward into Longueuil, right alongside the water and to the shoreline side, now, of the freeway.

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 16:05
At Notre Dame: View West to St. Lambert Locks

 

Click to Enlarge (Taken on South Shore Ride - May 23, 2004: ~ 16:05
At Notre Dame Street: Longueuil Trail Eastward

 

Top
On to Part III
Return to Menu

Prepared by Roger Kenner
February, 2005; Lite-Version: November, 2005